A Backpack With Wheels?

I wouldn’t have actually thought a backpack with wheels would, in fact, work for backpacking, but when I saw the web website for the “Wheelpacker”( TM), I was amazed. You use a frame that connects you to a wheeled pack. It began me believing about exactly what other best backpacking stoves 2018 developments are just waiting to be marketed.

With frame-less knapsacks, we often put folded sleeping pads in the pack for cushioning versus our backs and some assistance for the load. Why not simply have the part of the pack that rests versus the user’s back pump up. With the same technology utilized for light-weight self-inflating sleeping bag pads, it would only include about 6 ounces. The knapsack could then function as a footbag/pad for sleeping.

Taking this concept further, I think of a self-inflating knapsack that folds out into a sleeping pad. The backpack “frame” would be the pad, in a “U” shape for some rigidness in the pack. Self-inflating sleeping bag pads are as light as 14 ounces now, and frameless packs 12 ounces, so the mix could most likely be made to weigh just 20 ounces.

Wax Paper Food Bags

Put backpacking food in wax-paper packaging rather of plastic. The plans then function as emergency situation fire-starters, because the wax paper will generally burn even when damp.

Pillow/Waterbag

When I need to carry more water I utilize the plastic bladders from boxed wine. They are light, strong, and I pump up the bag with air to utilize as a pillow too.

Why not a frameless backpack with a coat that belongs to the pack? It can be folded out of the way, and the pack would have regular shoulder straps. When wearing the coat, however, it would support the pack, keep you warmer, and make it easy to press through heavy brush, since it wouldn’t catch on things as easily. It is something like wearing a large jacket over a knapsack, however with the weight-savings and stability that originate from integrating them. It might be called a “Jacket Pack-it.”

Backpacking Game

Print a chess/checkers board on a coat or backpack, and you have a carry-along game that weighs nothing extra. Great for investing hours in the camping tent waiting out the rain. If you don’t carry the pieces, stones or pine cones could work as checkers.

Backpacking gear concepts and developments keep popping into my head as I compose this. A lot of are based upon the idea of “dual function” products. They might work, some might not, but it is an entertaining dosage of motivation from a backpack with wheels.

With frameless backpacks, we often put folded sleeping pads in the pack for cushioning against our backs and some assistance for the load. Taking this concept further, I imagine a self-inflating knapsack that folds out into a sleeping pad. The backpack “frame” would be the pad, in a “U” shape for some rigidity in the pack. Why not a frameless backpack with a coat that is a part of the pack? It is something like using a large coat over a backpack, however with the weight-savings and stability that come from combining them.